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20121206
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to classified information. now, the white house denies this. "outfront" on the story, cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. >> you don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark 30" the story of the hunt for osama bin laden from the oscar winning powerhouse team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same w
that would bring down me or wikileaks. >> pentagon has maintained manning was held in accordance with rules regarding all maximum custody detainees. if convicted, they could go for life in prison. "outfront" tonight, chris lawrence is is at the pentagon. manning and his defense team, they have been claiming that the private was held in harsh conditions. he said quote, i'm going to die. i'm stuck inside this cage and he also said i have pretty much given up. my world had just shrunk. what else was in his testimony. >> he was very calm. dressed in his dress blues and described what it felt like in that first prison in kuwait. he said that's where he thought about suicide, then he was transferred to quantico, where he spent about five months in solitary confinement and he said that really brought him back to kuwait. he said i felt like i was being dragged back into that hole, so we heard a lot of description about what it was like for him under that sort of confinement. >> now, the military argues that keeping him was getting the circumstances. this is espionage. giving away secrets of the uni
and the pentagon. >> there was an event where operatives were involved and they did not know until they got there that the hollywood people were going to be present. so which means their identity would have been shown. >> reporter: king questions whether the military was pressured to cooperate on the film. >> what access they were told to give, some resisted, some acquiesced. >> reporter: cia and pentagon officials say no secrets were given away. >> my understanding is the hollywood people got access to cia operatives, cia locations, that they had access to navy s.e.a.l.s which they should not have had. and i can't really go beyond that other than to say that now, this investigation has gone on and it's been expanded. >> reporter: bowe says he and bigelow were very aware of national security concerns. >> we're acutely aware that there are sensitivities around this material, and i think we approached this with a lot of respect for those sensitivities. >> pretty -- i really want to see this movie. it does raise a legitimate concern about how much cooperation there is between the cia, between
in guantanamo bay. there are cases all across the u.s., the pentagon is now taking a position where it is saying arbitrarily that the act of receiving information by any journalist anywhere in the world, that the pentagon says is classified and publishing some portion of it, or quote from it is espionage. it applies to journalists and also applies to people within government. >> i understand your point. but the committee to protect journalists says about ecuador -- hold on. let me ask you the question. about ecuador, president correa has turned ecuador into one of the most restrictive nations for the press. i didn't agree to talk about the surveillance state. >> well, i'm sorry. look, do you want to bring my p.a.s on? please, please. so, look. let's be honest. we have a serious situation here. whatever little things that are occurring in small countries are not of concern. >> this country -- ecuador is the country that is preventing you from being arrested the minute you walk outside the door. >> including the united states, including western europe, including france, including what was happenin
of the conditions and that he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. the pentagon says manning was held in accordance with the rules but if convicted, he could face life in prison. "outfront" tonight, chris lawrence covering this at the pentagon. he said he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. they tried to poke some holes in that today. did they succeed? >> in some ways, erin, very much so. they got manning to admit the guards never actually ordered him to drop the blanket that was covering his body. let's back up. manning had made a crack because they had placed so many restrictions on him in confinement that if he really wanted to kill himself he could hang himself by his underwear. the guards took that seriously and that night he was stripped naked, except for a blanket. when he got up the next morning, he had to stand at parade rest. now manning had to admit today that he inferred from what the guard said that he had to drop that blanket to stand at parade rest and he admitted today they never actually said that. and, in fact, manning said that in later days, and in subseq
or bring down week key leaks. >> the pentagon has maintained that manning was held with rules for all maximum custody detainee. if convicted, he could get life in prison. chris, let me just ask you, manning and his defense team have been claiming that the private was held in harsh conditions. here's a quote from what he said today. he said, quote, i'm going to die. i'm stuck inside this cage. i had pretty much given up. my world had just shrunk. what else was in his testimony? >> well, he was very calmed. he was very composed. he was dressed in his dress blues and he described what it felt like in that first prison back in kuwait which he described as a black alond lone hole. then he was sent to quantico. we heard a lot of description about what it was like for him under that sort of confinement, erin. >> manning argues that keeping him in maximum prison was proper circumstances, this was espionage, something that could get the death penalty, even though they are not going for that. did they make that case? >> they are. they say, look, at the time, he was a maximum security detainee w
anywhere in the world that the pentagon says is classified is spying and that is something that is plies to journalists and also to government. but they say about ecuador hold on. in less than five years. >> as we agreed -- >> the issue is the surveillance state. we are in a situation -- >> i didn't agree to talk about the surveillance state. >> i'm sorry. look, do you want to bring my pa's on? >> please please. >> so look, let's be honest. we have a serious situation here. whatever little things are occurring in this country are not our concern. >> it is the country that is preventing you from being arrested the moment you walk outside the door. >> including western europe and the former libya. we have researched it. we have documented it. >> then why will you not talk about ecuador? >> because it is insignificant. >> but it is the country that is enabling you to not be arrested. >> it is people have been generous to me. >> yes. >> but it is not a significant world player. >> south america and the developments that are happening there are interesting and significant and it is growing in
. but the pentagon insists he was held in accordance with the rules. if convicted, manning faces life in prison. >>> and in the democratic republic of the congo, the rebel group known as m-23 defied a call to withdraw from the city of goma. they say they're going the remain in control of the city until the demands are met. including releasing political prisoners and dismissing the national election commission. the congo administration minister -- residents fear they'll be caught in the cross-fire, and what's been happening there is hard to imagine. >>> bob dole has been hospitalized. an aide says dole self-checked into walter reid for a routine procedure and will be discharged tomorrow. they say he's doing very well. there were questions raised about his health today after senate majority leader harry reid indicated on the floor that he was there for something more than a check-up. he talked about his love for him. >>> well, it has been 481 days since this country lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? there's good news today, consumer confidence hit a new high, september
was mistreated while in military custody. but the pentagon insists he was held in accordance with the rules. if convicted, manning faces life in prison. >>> bob doll dole has been hospitalized. he checked in to walter reed for a routine procedure and will be discharged tomorrow. there were subcommittees raised about his health after harry reid indicated that he was at walter reed for more than just a checkup and described him as infirm. >>> consumer confidence hit a four-year high today. >>> and now our fourth story outfront. coming clean on benghazi. susan rice went to capitol hill today to clear the air. she said, look, the talking points i used after the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya were wrong. she met with three of her most outspoken critics, republican senators john mccain, lindsey graham, and kelly ayotte to set the record straight. rice had gone on five sunday talk shows days after the attack and called it a spontaneous demonstration sparked by an antimuslim film and did not mention the link to al qaeda. after all this taking on her critics, the republican senators weren't i
. out front tonight, barbara starr, pentagon correspondent. this is a new front. drones themselves have changed the entire way this country will fight war forevermore but let's start with the bioswimmer. what can it do? >> reporter: well, this is a very interesting project that was actually funded by the department of homeland security to basically -- it takes the shape of a tuna because tuna can maneuver in the water, they can get into small places, and the idea is if you could put sensors on this, cameras, acoustics, radar, whatever, you could put this kind of device into u.s. bombers, maybe to go through shipwrecks, maybe to go through underground debris, maybe just to keep watch for potential terrorist attacks on u.s. ports. the whole idea with all of these programs is that nature really is, you know, the best way. there's a good lesson to be learned here. these are devices that can move as they do in nature like a tuna. tuna is pretty good at getting through the tight spots under water. >> when you think about just under water, simple things, 90% of the world's goods go by ship. yo
. phillips'. >>> breaking news out of the pentagon. sources tell cnn the u.s. is huddling with allies on what a chemical attack by assad would actually look like. we have a picture from former cia operative and contributor bob bayer to show you what the impact of a single shell of gas would be in launched on homs in syria. the large swath of the city that would be affected. it's estimated about 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to barbara starr. and barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario because if there were to be god forbid a chemical attack, the concern is some could drift across borders. worse even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it acros
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)